Feasability of a cursed item "monster"

The kickstarter reward mentions the option to suggest an enemy or monster. My friends and I have several ideas, some of which are more or less specifically a "monster."

My question is, how feasible is a cursed bow which changes (takes over) the mind of the NPC that wields it? The bow is extremely powerful and grants an immense blessing to the person who wields it... but makes that person into an avatar of a dogmatic and omnicidal psychopath. Only the most strong-willed individual can control the bow, and many stubborn or otherwise strong-willed people are all the more prone to the lure of power and "justice."

Is this a reasonable treasure/foe for Voxel Quest?

Comments

  • I like the idea, definitely doable. Had not put much consideration into items that effected personality traits :)
  • I like it! An item that overrides certain AI behavior if certain conditions are met (i.e. not enough will power) sounds very cool. Of course, the item has also a high desirability, so the quest for acquiring this item might be something that emerges with that. People of high status might try to get this item for their personal collection, while more adventurous individuals might actively seek it for their own glory.

    So many good stories... :)
  • @PTTG, that sounds great! Would it only affect NPCs, or could it affect the player as well? Would it affect the player differently, or maybe make your character a little rebellious and not respond exactly to your commands?
  • I imagine that the PC is, by definition, either so crazy and dogmatic that the bow wouldn't change anything, or else so willful (clearly, since he's wandering around meddling in everything) that he can overpower the bow.

    If the bow can take control, then it's basically the end of that character as a PC, and it wouldn't be very fun. One of my friends suggested having the PC black out or do things during "resting" periods.
  • The PC can still be influenced to do things. Like give visual feedback that gets worse the longer the bow is not fed, for example.
  • About PCs and control:

    You always have control of your player, and you always have free will. But acting outside of your role, personality, and motivations has detrimental effects. In this way, you are "encouraged" to make certain choices.

    Say, for example, your character has a greedy personality. If someone asked you if you could spare some gold coins, you can decide whether or not to give them. But it would negatively impact you to give out money for free, because it counters your characters personality and their motivations (negative goal score). You can fight your internal desires/motivations with the willpower/discipline stat.

    In the same way, wielding this bow would give you a strong desire to kill people. Only high discipline could counter this and prevent detrimental effects.

    As to what these detrimental effects entail - this has yet to be determined - could be anything from adversely effecting your stats, your comfort level, whatever.
  • In my experience, it doesn't take much to convince players to go on murderous rampages.

    Hell, just have the bow give you quests :grin:
  • gavanw said:

    About PCs and control:

    You always have control of your player, and you always have free will. But acting outside of your role, personality, and motivations has detrimental effects. In this way, you are "encouraged" to make certain choices.

    This is a really interesting concept. What determines this personality and your motivations? Do you decide what roles you want to adopt during some kind of character creation process (a la Fallout), or does your character keep a sort of moral momentum that amasses as you make decisions?

    I love the idea of having to stay in character for the length of a playthrough. I recently started Fallout 2, trying to play literally as myself: what kind of stats would I have if I existed in that world, how would I approach combat, would I steal things for my own benefit, etc. Course, the only limitations that Fallout places on my actions are the allocation of character traits in the beginning and the karma system throughout the game. How will VQ treat this, if it takes a similar approach?

  • This is a really interesting concept. What determines this personality and your motivations? Do you decide what roles you want to adopt during some kind of character creation process (a la Fallout), or does your character keep a sort of moral momentum that amasses as you make decisions?

    I love the idea of having to stay in character for the length of a playthrough. I recently started Fallout 2, trying to play literally as myself: what kind of stats would I have if I existed in that world, how would I approach combat, would I steal things for my own benefit, etc. Course, the only limitations that Fallout places on my actions are the allocation of character traits in the beginning and the karma system throughout the game. How will VQ treat this, if it takes a similar approach?

    Its modeled after real life, more or less. Every person is a product of their genetics and environment (i.e. nature vs nurture). The might be genetically predisposed towards a certain personality, but just as well certain events in the world might have an effect on their personality or motivations.
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