Prototype Gameplay Discussion

edited June 2015 in Design
I am shipping a minimally viable prototype game ASAP that will be a slight deviation from the long term goals of VQ. I am still planning to achieve my long term goals, but that will be down the road. The first goal is to get something fun into the hands of backers and ensure that I don't get stuck on hard problems in the short run.

...

The short term goal might be to work towards the long term goal but also implement something that is relatively easy, fun, and can be shipped fast as a quick prototype (similar to how Rockstar shipped a ping pong game with the GTA engine, although I am not planning to build something so drastically different). We have speculated about shipping a minimally viable game in the past (on the Twitch stream and so forth), but this might be a slight deviation in that regard. Whatever we put out will be similar to the long term goal in terms of code and assets, so most of the work put in should be towards a worthy cause. This is not to flip the switch on backers - the original goals are still there but in the short term we need to focus on what is viable, fun, and can be shipped fast, for everyone's sake. We will explain this in greater detail when we have nailed this down and if we are sure it is the right thing to do. We are also open to game ideas that would push VQ forward but at the same time provide a good mini game as a testbed (but at the same time we need to nail down these plans fast, so if something ends up being a large deviation from prior plans it may not be possible).

Ok, this sounds awesome. Let's talk about this!

Objectives for the prototype:
- Easy (to build)
- Fun (to play)
- Shippable Soon*
- Uses existing/future assets
- Acts as a testbed

Some proposals:

A swarm survival game; the PC is plopped into a world based on the existing terrain generator and the longer they stay in one place, the more mobs start showing up. Randomly generated structures provide anything from brief cover to long-term-bases to boss fight arenas. Light RPG elements (use loot to up stats in order to keep up with the constantly-increasing monster severity). Either keep moving and looking for loot or stay in place until the swarm kills you.

One life, but it may have a permanent environment where you can find the loot you dropped last time you died or the crater where you set off that box of grenades a couple of lives ago.

Some elements from finished Voxel Quest won't be there (such as advanced AI and RPG elements). It stress-tests and shows off some of the cool features of VQ (streaming terrain gen and a level of mutability). It ties into future development (expandable RPG elements, structure).

How easy is it? No idea. How fast to ship? Hard to say.

Other proposals and objectives welcome!
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Comments

  • That's a pretty sweet idea, and it covers many of the important bases:
    - combat prototype
    - exploration/getting people excited about what VQ can look like
    - basic character AI, both for moving around and combat
    - saving and loading world states
    - modifying player characteristics and abilities
    - some sort of system for changing the world's state and adapting to the player

    We've been throwing around some ideas in the weekly call that share some similarities with yours, but I'm going to need @gavanw 's approval before I can say anything, haha.

    I especially like your idea though because it could be adapted to turn-based/isometric and real-time/first-person play. Do you have a particular mode in mind?

    Also, depending on if Gavan lets the source code out for it, that'd be a really cool starting place for modding as well!

    The only area where I can see some issues is adding in items and stats upgrades: those (can be) big systems and take time to get right. If you're going to include them, they are really, really important to make fun. But at the same time, it doesn't have to be complicated to be a good experience.
  • edited June 2015
    PTTG said:


    A swarm survival game; the PC is plopped into a world based on the existing terrain generator and the longer they stay in one place, the more mobs start showing up. Randomly generated structures provide anything from brief cover to long-term-bases to boss fight arenas. Light RPG elements (use loot to up stats in order to keep up with the constantly-increasing monster severity). Either keep moving and looking for loot or stay in place until the swarm kills you.


    This actually is not that far off from what I was planning. And to @PreacherJayne - yes we can talk about it. :)

    The initial idea that we had revolved around building structures and surviving an onslaught - sort of like Tower defense but not just with passing creeps - rather having monsters that are trying to circumvent your structures and defenses to take down a central critical point (like capture a flag, or whatever).

    One potential addition to this was to have it be a mirrored contest between two players (even if just AI or two player multiplayer or whatever). Players would build their bases (or castles, or whatever) and send waves at eachother, trying to defend against the other person's wave. Sort of like a simplified RTS (no issuing commands, your creeps just go right at the other base) but more focus on structural layout.

    The other thing on top of this was that you would control at least one hero and issue orders to them. So it kind of has an element of DotA to it. Maybe it turns out that your heros are the only ones who can actually capture the flag (the creeps just do damage to each other and structures).

    Again, these things could be quite complex if you really dug deep into the design and everything, but the goal is to keep it simple and I think this is one of those concepts that could be fun even in the early/rough stages.

    I do like the idea of just a swarm as well - I thought the old BoxHead flash games were entertaining, for as simple as they were.
    http://www.crazymonkeygames.com/Boxhead-The-Zombie-Wars.html

    Networked multiplayer might make more sense than AI based on the game type. Could also be interesting to do a very straight-forward FPS game (think Doom or Heretic), with the added caveat that you can place structures as you go. I think that actually could be the simplest/most fun thing (even though I am rarely drawn to modern FPS games), although not sure how much of a deviation that would be. It could also be such that you could prebuild a map and then use it, or export it for others to use, etc. Would be a good way to seed the game with map content. You could just as well at that CTF element to it, minus the creeps.

    An FPS game might seem a ways off, but I was planning to support something along these lines. The engine already supports a free flying, third person, and FPS camera, as demoed prior. Although the long term game I want to make revolves more around tactics and turn-based stuff, I must also consider the needs of modders (and the community at large - not everyone is into turn-based stuff). I am planning to add a system that transitions pretty well between simultaneous turn-based and realtime anyhow, just to have that support within the engine if nothing else.

    Anyhow, mostly thinking out loud - I am open to all ideas :)
  • There's definitely room in the FPS field for something with live terrain modification.

    For a while I was thinking about a game featuring both an FPS and an RTS side (and here we're starting to stray rather widely from the "simple" part of the document, I know). Basically, you got upgrade points, and you could either spend them into your hero or on your units. Maybe it's more specific: get a fireball spell in your loot and you can use it yourself or you can build fire troopers.

    Alternatively, one player controls an RTS game and tries to kill all the other players, who are playing an FPS. Balancing that is a nightmare, I'm sure.

    Going back to the simple stuff, an isometric FPS could be interesting. Navigate by running around a classic isometric world. Click to shoot, complete with your character figuring out the trajectories for you. Such a design fits well with a simple RPG where you can increase your HP in character design by sacrificing Accuracy, for instance.

    How well does the engine handle large areas? Could it run a flight sim game, where many square miles of terrain could be visible at once? If so, could it handle very long-distance combat?
  • PTTG said:


    How well does the engine handle large areas? Could it run a flight sim game, where many square miles of terrain could be visible at once? If so, could it handle very long-distance combat?

    Yes, there is no limit on the rendering distance - the primary limit is on how dense the object count can be over a given area. So, I could make a visible area that spans hundreds of miles but only place X objects every Y miles. Right now, to keep the potential object density high within small areas, the visible distance is variable but generally somewhere between 50-300 meters IIRC (~150-900 feet). It could potentially do both - render only big objects far away, and then smaller groups of more dense objects closer to the camera.

    You can see one example of it handling far view distances with the terrain thing I whipped up:
    image


  • This is good news for me and my planned DF viewer, because it means I can show the distant landscape as well as the current fortress, in varying levels of detail.

    Although I still haven't solved the issue of how to have distant landscape at the same time as slicing Z levels, with them working nicely together. Unless I just slice the entire world at once.
  • PTTG said:

    There's definitely room in the FPS field for something with live terrain modification.

    That's one of the strengths of my favorite 2D sidescroller (and probably favorite 2D game of all time, honestly) Broforce (web demo here using the Unity3D WebPlayer, and they released a standalone spinoff for free that ties in the with most recent Expendables movie). Super simple concept - you have a primary weapon and secondary ability, you can jump and cling to walls, and there's a ton of pixellated, blocky explosions. A 3D game in a similar vein, even in a fantasy setting with magic and melee combat, would 1) look great in the VQ engine, 2) not take too much art time, if you keep it blocky, and 3) be a ton of fun to play while we wait for VQ to emerge in all its glory. :wink:

    There are a lot of ways you could take it, from a standard level-based shooter to a more open survival game with waves of enemies. Adding to @PTTG 's concept, it'd be sweet to have a few minutes to gather resources/construct a base, then fight a wave of enemies, then have another period of time to scramble to loot the bodies (and maybe get materials that provide buffs like increased enemy fear or resistance to monster poison or whatever) before the next wave hits. Integrating a turn-based system would be a little difficult if you're set on keeping the combat mechanics for each mode similar, but if you're okay with two separate systems (one an FPS and the other something more like Fallout/DnD/etc), you could keep the objectives the same without too much issue. I'd play the shit out of that.

  • This reminds me of an old HL2 mod where you would construct a base in between rounds of CTF
  • I talked to another dev who had faced many of these design issues both in his work and as a player. There are many things to consider. He said most importantly the game should be fun with 2 players. He said the base building thing could get stale if you force both players into a defensive position so I will have to think around that (the creep thing might alleviate that, or building automated defenses). Having two mobile flags is also chaotic, as players have difficulty tracking which one is going where and without many players it usually becomes a free-for all with flag-grabbing. Swarm idea has the downfall that producing something innovative against the computer is not as interesting as doing it against another player. He recommended using Steam to handle match-making, which I suspected was going to be the route.
  • What if players are on the same team? Often you have two-four players, too few to have two complicated teams (defense, offense, support, etc.) If all players are trying to survive together, even two players can diversify into, say, combat and support.
  • PTTG said:

    What if players are on the same team? Often you have two-four players, too few to have two complicated teams (defense, offense, support, etc.) If all players are trying to survive together, even two players can diversify into, say, combat and support.

    Yep that could work - survival has to have a good balance on ramping in terms of difficulty.
  • edited July 2015
    My roommate and I have gotten together solid concept for a party-based combat MOBA that could be adapted to controlling 1 or 3 characters at the same time -- I'll post the entire concept once I have it written out in detail.

    I really like the idea of having a party of characters like in Baldur's Gate, so I'll try to do a write-up of what it could look like in survival mode as well.
  • Gathering sparse concepts, PvP or PvE combat, turn-based like Gavan wanted, live terrain modification... guys, we're practically talking of 3D/voxel Worms. Projectile magic and swords instead of bazookas and sheep, three dimensional movement instead of side scrolling, terrain altered by combat, it could show some capabilities of the engine and work as test bed for some VQ mechanics. :P
  • edited July 2015

    Gathering sparse concepts, PvP or PvE combat, turn-based like Gavan wanted, live terrain modification... guys, we're practically talking of 3D/voxel Worms. Projectile magic and swords instead of bazookas and sheep, three dimensional movement instead of side scrolling, terrain altered by combat, it could show some capabilities of the engine and work as test bed for some VQ mechanics. :P

    Yep, the original "simple" concept/prototype idea I came up with was something along the lines of scorched earth / worms. And there is still quite a bit that can be pulled from those designs. :) With regards to whether or not it will be turn-based, I want to see if I can make turn-based and real time both work using the same game mechanisms (more complex than simply "pausing" a realtime game).

    Talking more about the plans with some other people and deliberating with myself, I came up with some more design ideas (every now and then I talk with a group of indies based in Vancouver, user frogtoss has been really helpful as he has worked in this area in the past.

    One consideration was "join-in-progress" or JIP. Without JIP and without critical mass, it becomes painful (for the average user) to wait around for a match to join. If there is any sort of leveling or buffing, you probably have to compensate for a JIP, and in my newest ideas there might be such things.

    At this point to keep it fun for 1v1, allow JIP, and so on, it seems like a good starting point might be capture the flag (CTF) but timer-based instead of goal-based. In traditional CTF, you capture the flag, and then the flag returns to the center of the map. I think to make this more interesting, and more incentive for base building, it would be CTF but whoever holds the flag for the longest period of time wins.

    Alternately, to put a twist on it, it could be something of the opposite. Maybe you are playing hot-potato with a timed bomb and you try and plant it in the enemy's base. :)

    I wanted to make it fun even without any sort of base-building (although the base building will be there for players to utilize). One idea I was thinking of is to limit player's ability to destroy the terrain (kind of in the same way Spelunky does with limited amount of bombs and pick-axe swings. Embedded within the terrain could be gold and gems you use to buy stuff. You could also embed runes or artifacts (for the sake of discussion lets just call them runes). Each rune would grant you a unique ability, not just combat related - maybe the ability to jump higher, to double jump, the ability to dig, the ability to spot things hidden in the terrain (as Spelunky does with the spectacles. A rune might provide fire resistance, stealth, ability to heal or vampirism (health from damage), ability to spawn a certain type of minion, ability to build faster, etc. The main point is that all the runes are unique in their function, and not simple modifiers (health +1, damage +1, etc). Using runes could tap into mana potentially, preventing them from being abused. Maybe a user only has X rune slots, forcing them to pick their runes wisely, and perhaps build a store room for runes they might want later.

    In addition to perhaps picking a base class, this could make matches play out in a unique, unpredictable manner each time (pulling from ye old CCG mechanic I always talk about). Say there were 20 runes, and only 10 exist in a given match - that would be over 670 billion possible match combinations ignoring the possible classes you could pick. There will likely be way more than 20 runes though, as each rune should not be programatically difficult to implement. You could add in additonal mechanics like players have to drop one random rune every time they die (TBD if that is a good idea). A base class + runes is very similar to Desktop Dungeons - it allows a unique way to subclass your character dynamically during a session.

    To make levels interesting right away, I was thinking they could potentially be composed of miniature prefabricated level pieces that get randomly placed. Good seeds can be reused by players if they want (maybe there is even a seed ranking algorithm). This is another design lifted from Spelunky, which uses the same technique to great success.
  • (Works the same in SCP: Containment Break, it asks you for an alphanumeric seed or just makes a random one, then it procedurally generates the game from that. If you fail, even with permadeath you can write down the seed and have the chance to play again the same level.)
    Nice flood of awesome ideas there, from the game modes with worms/capture the flag/hot runebomb to the mechanics with terrain mod and runes. It'll be fun to play any path you choose for the test game.
    If anything, we have to make sure the game emphasizes the usefulness (and coolness) of voxels, beyond the "dig here, gather stuff, build walls there, and keep Creepers at bay" that other game already did more than enough. We have to show to curious people or early adopters that small voxels have a use, to gain more reputation and support. VQ has to make even more of name for itself, and this test game could work as both techdemo and publicity medium.
  • edited July 2015
    I would not recommend flag-holding CTF. A base is useless to the losing team, essential to the team that currently has the flag... it ends up making the game "latch" to whoever captures the flag first.

    I'm trying to think of how you can make it more volatile... perhaps if we stretch the definition of a "flag." What if there are dozens of flags popping into existence all over the map, and both sides have a collection point? So you can hunt around the map to collect scattered flags, or you can invade the enemy base and steal from their concentrated flag collection.

    You get flags^2 points per second (or whatever), so even if you're really behind, you can jump ahead with a little luck/skill.
  • PTTG said:

    I would not recommend flag-holding CTF. A base is useless to the losing team, essential to the team that currently has the flag... it ends up making the game "latch" to whoever captures the flag first.

    I'm trying to think of how you can make it more volatile... perhaps if we stretch the definition of a "flag." What if there are dozens of flags popping into existence all over the map, and both sides have a collection point? So you can hunt around the map to collect scattered flags, or you can invade the enemy base and steal from their concentrated flag collection.

    You get flags^2 points per second (or whatever), so even if you're really behind, you can jump ahead with a little luck/skill.

    That's a really good idea, I may implement something along those lines. I will likely try out a few variations on rules (so long as the variations are easy to switch up).
  • edited July 2015
    I've been lurking on these forums for quite some time, and honestly I think I have a pretty good gameplay model for a prototype that could utilize the unique characteristics of your engine. Bear with me this is a pretty big idea, but for the sake of the prototype imagine a procedural world in which you are a character who starts off at a small outpost that is capable of being upgraded with buildings that incorporate different functions(food, money, village happiness) not unlike the civilization games. Now the primary goal of the player would be initially to gain resources from other enemy(maybe barbarian) outposts.

    Taking into account the basic economic principles that power a game like "destiny", bungie was able to create a very rudimentary resource based economy that scales. However in the procedural environment the world could be much more rich and interactive than destiny ever could. This would be possible by feeding several autonomous emergent Ai functions to give the illusion that the world is living. This would be easy because each building in a village or outpost could be tailored to a specific function. So by building something associated with food could mean that realtime hunters go out to get food.

    Combat could be guns or swords or whatever, but should be very similar to VATS in fallout if you want to have cheap cost auxiliary combat. This would mean you could change firing modes on guns, fluctuate the amount of rounds in a burst, and generally have a lot of flexibility in the amount of weapons you could make that all feel different.

    There should ideally be destruction, however the prototype wouldn't have to be mining based like mine craft, instead it would be more about picking up loot off of enemies such as scrap metal, guns, food, or money. And missions again like destiny would come from vendors and villagers each with their own concerns, vendors being concerned with bandits attacking caravans or making money, and citizens with a bunch of their own prescripted missions.

    The important part of this prototype is that it would only need to encompass maybe two different biomes with minor fluctuations in generation, so that there are fields, and forests, and open plains. The real test would be making the world feel alive and making sure that the player can see real repercussions to their actions. That way it could last around 10-20 hours and still maintain cohesion to feel like a real game despite the openendedness. The real shakeup would be in the different ways that all the outposts can end up, in no way should players be able to obtain every upgrade for settlements and outposts. There should be opportunity costs and ways to tailor a settlement to meet ones own needs. If players are fortunate to get a lot of recourses early on but spend all their upgrades getting lumbermills then clear cutting should be apparent. If towns are overcrowded then there should be sickness and more poor looking people. Again if the total encompassing environment is small by procedural standards then a revolutionary gameplay model such as this is very possible.
  • edited July 2015
    Though the idea is good, I'm worried it might be too involved for a quick prototype.
  • I know it sounds involved, but I think that the Worms prototype concept seems like just a boring proof of concept. The same goes for the ctf idea. The problem is that while they may show foundational Concepts like destruction or procedural creation, they fail to convey the grand design that this engine promises.

    In the prototype I am proposing, there would only need to be 5-10 buildings that would be used as settlement upgrades. Not too far off of clash of clans. Speaking of clash of clans they have an entire economic model based off of gold And that purple ooze shit. anyway each building would serve a function as mentioned. The whole point is that While players are going around gathering, doing missions, and fighting enemies, they can see the world around them evolve and change as a result of their own actions. This would be simple at first, only Farms would be grown, trees would be cut, and houses would be built to house populace. These here are already 3 of 5-10 buildings. Each building could have upgrade capacity again like clash of Clans with 2-3 total upgrades. This allows the prototype to be easily expanded and essentially makes it a modular game format.

    Players Seeing real meaningful tangible change, will always go past the usual gameplay Tropes. Tropes that have been long established in games like worms or ctf.
  • edited July 2015
    @Johnnycoasey - I agree that the short term prototype is not as exciting as the longer term plans (which do focus more on having a living, persistent world). Nonetheless, whatever is done in the short term is designed with simplicity and fun in mind first. Those two goals go against a big open-world game, which takes a lot of time to make fun, and a lot of time to make work at all. Regardless of that, the short term prototype is working more or less in parallel towards these goals (for example, it supports arbitrarily large map sizes instead of a fixed map size like you might see in a normal FPS). Hope that makes sense. :)

    Going along with your ideas more, I have thought of straying towards some minor RTS aspects - things like mining gold and bringing it to your base, building functional buildings (as per RTS games and Clash of Clans and so forth), and more. But these things need to be simple to implement and easy to balance if I do put them in.
  • Since you're talking about bringing in some RTS elements, I have another game suggestion -- probably definitely not for the prototype, but something I'd be very interested in developing with the VQ engine.

    Overview and Objectives

    Each player leads a small party of characters through an unfamiliar wilderness, taking over hostile settlements and gathering artifacts to increase their power and diminish that of their opponent. Eventually, both players will be forced to fight for dominance or to destroy the other's base camp. A player loses if every member of his party is dead at the same time or if his camp is destroyed and he can't evacuate his party members in the allotted timeframe.

    Other objectives could include a CS:GO-style "one team plants a bomb and the other defuses it", a race to infiltrate/clear a neutral castle or structure, etc.

    Environment

    The environment should be randomly generated each playthrough and should feature a variety of landscapes. Forest, mountains, some water, plateaus, cliffs, plains -- a nice variety of things that could alternately affect visibility or mobility, provide places to create tunnels and traps, etc. For a single-player survival game, the map should be unlimited or at least very large. For a multiplayer game, it makes more sense for the map to be constrained and perhaps to have rotational symmetry for fairness.

    Characters

    Each player controls between one and six characters, depending on the game mode. Each character has a set of base statistics and a class; statistics determine a character's health, action points, combat proficiency, etc. and class determines the character's skill tree.

    Variations

    The way I see it, there are three possible variations that could be interesting:

    - a singleplayer real-time-with-pause/simultaneous turn-based survival game where the player controls a party of 5 or 6 on an open-ended map with waves of enemies
    - a multiplayer 6v6 where each player controls just one character
    - a multiplayer 2v2 or 4v4 where each player controls three characters (but with a limited number of skills because it would get crazy fast)

    Skills and Upgrades

    Regardless of the game mode or variation, a character's skill tree depends on his/her class. Each skill tree includes new skills as well as bonuses to already existing skills. Instead of a strict tree where more powerful skills can only be unlocked with a single chain of prerequisites, skills are unlockable through a variety of paths. There is no respec option for reallocating skill points.

    Characters earn skill points by defeating enemies, performing their role well (healing, doing damage, scouting, etc), and by taking strongholds or artifacts (more on this later). When earned, skill points are awarded immediately -- no waiting for characters to reach the next level. Characters can upgrade their skills as soon as they're available. Though they can upgrade their skills anywhere, upgrading does require a small amount of time during which the characters are inactive.

    Experience is shared by the entire party/team. When one character gains experience/skill points, all members of their group gain skill points as well (perhaps correlated with their class or other modifiers).

    Though each character has a large skill tree open to them, the number of skills that they may currently have active depends on the game mode. In singleplayer and single-character multiplayer, each character has the maximum allowed skill slots (probably 6 or 7). In multi-character multiplayer, each character only has 3 or 4 skill slots open. Characters can spend points in areas of the skill tree that they aren't using, but there are restrictions on the frequency with which characters can switch their active skills (perhaps limited to being at a base, some sort of cooldown/period of inactivity, etc).

    Finally, each character has access to one or two slots for artifacts: objects that grant bonuses to stats/offense/defense, enable additional skills, or give some other positive or negative effect. Some skills may grant a character the ability to steal a random artifact from their opponents during combat.

    Neutral Enemies and Base-building

    As the characters explore the world, they'll encounter two types of neutral mobs.

    Scattered around the map are groups of enemies that each guard an artifact. Defeating one of these groups grants the player a large bounty of experience, but the player must swap out one of their character's active artifacts for the artifact dropped by the enemy.

    Players will also happen upon neutral bases built on sacred, nutrient-rich ground. After capturing a base by defeating its inhabitants or razing it to the ground, players can build new structures to automatically gather resources. Resources grant additional skill points for upgrades or unlock items/armor for boosting character stats. Building structures may be locked to sacred ground only, or maybe some types of buildings could be built elsewhere.

    In multiplayer mode, players can build structures that spawn a limited assortment of creeps. Upon creation, players can issue a single order to each creep to either stay and guard the base or to pursue some other objective like attacking an enemy camp. Once set, a creep's purpose cannot change.

    Camps

    Players begin the game at their camp -- a small arrangement of supplies that supports their characters' efforts by providing a place to store items/artifacts, granting constant regeneration of health and action points, and maybe providing other bonuses. Once their camp is destroyed, characters must evacuate the map within a certain time limit before their resources run out. In multiplayer mode, each player has its own camp. Players on a team can "share" the bonuses camps, but the destruction of one or more camps results in decreased benefits for the entire team.

    Camps can be both moved and upgraded. Moving a camp takes time, but can give the player a more defensible location. Camps can upgrade as well (digging trenches, building walls, maybe buildings that boost healing), but not to the same extent as buildings built on sacred ground. Fortifying a camp comes at a price, as it becomes more difficult to move later in the game; also, enemies will be more likely to discover a camp that's been expanded.

    Other Notes

    I think this would be sweet to see in either a non-generic fantasy setting (maybe science fiction, then?) or a world where magic has completely supplanted traditional hand-to-hand combat. With the flexibility of the VQ terrain system, there's a lot of cool environmental and gameplay effects that would make for original gameplay.



    Reading back over this, there's a lot to swallow and definitely not manageable in a half-year timeframe. It's something that I would love to play, though. I was aiming for a nice mix of RPG stat balancing and combat with some of the competitive elements of MOBAs.

    Thoughts? Would you play it?
  • Definitely would play. Both the proposals sound like really fun games!
    But again we have to remember the target of the prototype: a quick and dirty, simple game, to test the engine, appease the eager fans and attract other people. Must not be too complex to do, or it will subtract too much time from the development of the main game.
    Those ideas could become great mods, though. Or minigames, kinda like all those extra modes in Plants vs Zombies, if you know it.
    For the prototype, I liked where we were going with Gavan, Preacherjayne and PTTG's ideas.
  • @Talvieno has put together a really, really sweet list of abilities and attacks for the prototype, it's going to be a blast.

    Gavan put out a video the other day that shows what exploring the world (and destroying it, haha) could look like:
    https://youtu.be/9baOT3GpZ58
  • Wow, that looks fantastic.

    Makes me hope for a way to move around vertically (jetpack/grappling hook/multijump/etc.)
  • Obviously the ninja rope.
  • @Talvieno has put together a really, really sweet list of abilities and attacks for the prototype, it's going to be a blast.

    Gavan put out a video the other day that shows what exploring the world (and destroying it, haha) could look like:
    https://youtu.be/9baOT3GpZ58

    Let's hope we'll see that list soon...
    That demo video looks amazing and shows some of the last great improvements. But, given its fractal structure, that environment looks like something more enjoyable by a flying creature than a normal human... :P

  • That demo video looks amazing and shows some of the last great improvements. But, given its fractal structure, that environment looks like something more enjoyable by a flying creature than a normal human... :P

    Yeah, this is just generic 3D noise, easiest thing to put out (aside from 2D noise, which just looks like a heightmap). It will likely be some combination of the two - I have kind of tried things like this, here you can see my first attempt:

    image

    Might be a little hard to tell here, but there isnt a whole lot of room for vertically stacked structures here - it more leans towards a heightmap (although there are still some concave areas).
  • This looks so much like the old minecraft mapgen in a good way.
  • Doesn't look half bad! Despite it not being very "edifiable", it still seems navigable by foot, and let's not forget that some concave area here and there is how nature makes it, too.
  • When @gavanw first introduced VQ and the KS campaign, I already had a gameplay idea in mind that I was thinking about implementing once VQ was released. Now I figure I might as well share it with the rest of the class :smile:

    It's essentially a mix of Pokemon (gameboy version, red/blue/etc.) and Jade Cocoon (PS1), but more free-form, which I believe VQ would be able to handle really well. So basically you go out hunting for (procedurally generated?) Voxelmons (hum...) in the vast VQ world, fight other players, train/upgrade your Voxelmons, make them mate with various statistics and so on. It's kind of RPG-ish, would require basic fighting mechanisms but I don't think anything crazy either, fun to play by yourself AND with other people, etc.

    Based on everything I've seen/read about VQ so far, it looks like it could be feasible and within reason for a prototype, but it's also very possible I have absolutely no idea what I'm talking about.
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